The bitter colds months are here and southern tier and northern Pennsylvania homes are turning up the heat.

The Firemen’s Association of the State of New York reminds you that heating homes is the second leading cause of homes fires, injuries and death.

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Many New Yorkers and Pennsylvanians are working from their homes and keeping the heat turned up, and putting more work on our furnaces and heat sources.

According to a FASNY news release December, January, and February are the months for fires caused by heating sources in our homes.

Make sure you are following all safety precautions during these times.

Smaller units like space heaters and plug-in electric heaters can increase the risk of fire in your home, and are responsible for 25,000 house fires, and thousands of burn injuries, if they are not properly used.

Always make sure your heating equipment is maintained and working properly, and make sure you have sufficient smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in your home, and check the batteries.

In the news release FASNY President John P Farrell says “We recommend everyone place carbon monoxide alarms outside of sleeping areas in the home, especially as it gets colder and snow may block exhaust pipes in homes. We want all New Yorkers to be fire-safe this winter and remember—  if there is a fire: get out, stay out, and call 911”

Here are a few tips from the Firemen’s Association of the State of New York.

  • Do Not use your oven to heat your home.
  • Always have a qualified professional install heating equipment, furnace, space heaters, hot water heaters, etc.
  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month.
  • Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from heaters.
  • Have heating equipment maintained and inspected and chimneys cleaned each year by a qualified professional
  • Always use the right type of fuel for the furnace of space heater in your home

 

Be Safe this winter, for more information CLICK HERE

 

 

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