Are you aware that the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation releases a new Habitat and Access Stamp every year?

According to the NYS DEC, it was created by the New York State Legislation in 2002. The Habitat & Access Stamp costs $5 dollars and helps supply financial support towards "efforts in improving and conserving fish and wildlife habitat, as well as increasing access to public and private lands for fish and wildlife recreation."

And each year, the stamp features a different species found in the State of New York. The species is voted on by the public, and this year's featured species will be the Red Eft. I had no clue what that was until I looked at a picture of one.

Just under 1000 votes were cast with the Red Eft receiving the most at 32 percent, followed by the American Kestral at 25 percent, and in third through fifth - the Northern Long-Eared Bat,  Karner Blue Butterfly, and Bluegill.

The stamp will go on sale beginning August 1st. One of the projects completed thanks to purchases of the stamp includes improved angler access and parking areas on Otego Creek in the Town of Oneonta, and Grassland habitat improvement in Stueben and Schuyler counties, according to the NYS DEC.

The NYS DEC emphasizes that the Habitat and Access Stamp is not required to purchase to hunt, fish or trap, and you don't have to buy a sporting license to donate for a stamp.

Check out more about the Red Eft in the video below from Nature at Your Door with Frank Taylor.

via New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

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