A Binghamton University researcher sometimes must go to a really quiet place to do his work.

That's when Ron Miles, a distinguished professor in the school's mechanical engineering department, enters a special room called an anechoic chamber in the Innovative Technologies Complex.

Binghamton University distinguished professor Ron Miles in the anechoic chamber on the Vestal campus. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
Binghamton University distinguished professor Ron Miles in the anechoic chamber on the Vestal campus. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Miles uses the underground chamber as his lab. It's regarded as one of the quietest rooms in the world with walls covered with materials that absorb sounds. It's surrounded by heavy, thick walls designed to prevent sounds - like vibrations from trucks on the nearby Vestal Parkway - from being heard inside.

Miles said most of his research involves technology for sensing sound, including microphones. The goal of some of the work is to develop better hearing aids.

Miles said to do that, "a very, very quiet space" is needed.

Specialized equipment inside the Binghamton University anechoic chamber. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
Specialized equipment inside the Binghamton University anechoic chamber. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Miles has been with the Binghamton University mechanical engineering department since 1989.

His acoustic research has explored the hearing capabilities of flies, mosquitoes and spiders.

The door to Binghamton University anechoic chamber features some comparisons with similar facilities. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
The door to Binghamton University anechoic chamber features some comparisons with similar facilities. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com.

For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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