Many fans of Binghamton's News Radio 1290 WNBF will be pleased to learn that they now can hear their favorite information and talk programs on FM.

WNBF now is heard on 92.1 FM, in addition to AM 1290 where the station has been available since August 1942.

The WNBF FM translator broadcasts from the station's Ingraham Hill transmitter site in the town of Binghamton.

This isn't the first time in WNBF Radio's nearly 95-year history that its programs has been available via "frequency modulation" or FM. The station has operated an FM station at 100.5 and 98.1 over the years.

WNBF-FM became Binghamton's "Quiet Island" - WQYT - in February 1973. The beautiful music format at 98.1 FM was popular for nearly 11 years until Stoner Broadcasting launched Stereo Country WHWK in January 1984.

WNBF's local programs originate in the legendary Studio One in the heart of downtown Binghamton. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
WNBF's local programs originate in the legendary Studio One in the heart of downtown Binghamton. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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The new WNBF translator's FCC-assigned call letters are W221EJ. Tune in at 92.1 FM to listen around the Triple Cities.

You also may wish to install the WNBF app on your phone so you'll always be connected with News Radio 1290 virutally anywhere.* (Go ahead: Install it now. You know you'll love it. Click HERE.)

Feel free to let your friends know they can enjoy WNBF's news and talk programs at 92.1 FM.

* - Some restrictions may apply.

Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com.

For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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