You no longer are required to wear a mask to enter the Broome County Office Building but you must do so if you want to enter Binghamton City Hall.

Governor Kathy Hochul allowed the statewide mask mandate for businesses to expire effective Thursday.

In conjunction with Hochul's announcement, Broome County Executive Jason Garnar lifted the mask requirement for county government buildings.

But a sign at the entrance to Binghamton City Hall on Thursday advised visitors that "You Still Need a Mask in This Building."

The Binghamton government website notes that because "City Hall is host to Binghamton City Court, the building is abiding by New York State Unified Court System Covid-19 screening protocols and mask requirements."

Officers at the security checkpoint ask visitors whether they have any Covid symptoms and require them to use a wall-mounted thermometer to ensure they don't have a fever.

Representatives of the state court system could not be reached for information on when the mask rule might be dropped.

People who participated in a Thursday news conference held by Mayor Jared Kraham, along with reporters, all wore masks during the event.

In an email, Deputy Mayor Megan Heiman said city offices have lifted the mask requirement in line with the governor's announcement.

Heiman noted the Unified Court System sets the rules for the City Hall lobby and for the fifth floor, where the city court is located.

This story was updated to include additional information from the mayor's office.

Jared Kraham outside Binghamton City Hall on January 12, 2021, shortly after he announced he was running for mayor. Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News
Jared Kraham outside Binghamton City Hall on January 12, 2021, shortly after he announced he was running for mayor. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com. For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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