A convenience store will soon occupy some of the space that was vacated when a bank closed its downtown Binghamton branch office.

People familiar with the business being planned at 65 Court Street say it is expected to open next month.

A sign for the business - which will be called "Beer Bros" - was installed on the building east of State Street this week.

The soon-to-open convenience store at 65 Court Street is located near downtown student housing complexes. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
The soon-to-open convenience store at 65 Court Street is located near downtown student housing complexes. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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The small shop will use about 1,100 square feet of space which had been part of the KeyBank office that was shut down last June 25.

The new store will sell beer, along with other items including "exotic candies" and ice cream.

Online records for the New York State Liquor Authority indicate Beer Bros 65 LLC has applied for a license to sell beer for off-premises consumption. According to the records, the application was received on January 28.

The building on the northeast corner of Court and State streets is owned by an entity with a Johnson City address. It has been home to various banks in recent decades, including First Niagara, HSBC and Chase Manhattan.

Most of the space that was occupied by Key Bank remains vacant, although another business may be developed there later this year.

A KeyBank sign was removed from a building at 65 Court Street on June 28, 2021. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
A KeyBank sign was removed from a building at 65 Court Street on June 28, 2021. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com.

For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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