An abandoned electricity and steam generating facility in Binghamton's First Ward could be repurposed in the future.

The cogeneration plant at 22 Charles Street was built by Anitec Image Corporation to provide power for its massive manufacturing complex. Natural gas was the primary fuel it used, although it sometimes was powered by oil that was stored at the site.

A California-based company acquired the facility in 2012 to generate power only at times of peak-demand. Wellhead Electric pulled the plug on the plant after losing millions of dollars on the venture.

Steam rising from the Charles Street Cogeneration Plant on January 6, 2015. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
Steam rising from the Charles Street Cogeneration Plant on January 6, 2015. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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The city of Binghamton took possession of the property when Wellhead donated it after removing the useable generating equipment from the building.

Mayor Jared Kraham told WNBF News that because of new state regulations, the complex could never again be used as a natural gas-fueled generating plant.

Kraham said the city has obtained a grant through the state Energy Research and Development Authority to study potential reuse of the site.

Workers removed a General Electric turbine from the Charles Street plant on January 31, 2018. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
Workers removed a General Electric turbine from the Charles Street plant on January 31, 2018. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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City council has just approved selling the generating plant property to the Binghamton Local Development Corporation, which owns the adjacent Charles Street Business Park.

The mayor said the unique building with high bay space could be repurposed as part of a future business park project.

Kraham said the city also will explore the possibility of connecting the Charles Street site with Prospect Street. He noted its difficult for truck traffic from Route 17 to easily travel through the First Ward.

A sign at the abandoned power plant on December 8, 2023. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
A sign at the abandoned power plant on December 8, 2023. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com. For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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